Passenger Lists: San Francisco 1800s


 

SS Columbia

Arrive San Francisco

February 24, 1851
Lt. Edward F. Beale
From Panama

Passage

Left Panama 9 p.m. on the 2d inst. Second day out spoke steamer Antelope, hence, and on the night of the 6th passed two steamers. Off Cape Blano, observed a vessel showing signals of distress; ran down, and found her to be the ship Trident, from San Francisco for Panama, with passengers -- short of bread. Supplied her with flour. Left Acapulco on the 11th inst. and met steamer Republic, hence, going in. Left San Blas on the 12th Mazatlan on the 14th and San Diego on the 18th inst. Steamer California was to sail from the latter place for this port the day following. Left at Panama steamer Carolina, to sail in five days; Columbus, with a portion of machinery damaged, New Orleans and Sarah Sands.

From the hills of San Francisco.

Cargo

To E. Knight

Cuna Indian Woman.
Cuna Indian Woman Displays Her Molas, San Blas Islands, Panama

The Kuna Indians are a strongly-knit tribal society living on a chain of islands called San Blas Archipelago, on the Atlantic side of the Republic of Panama. Believed to be descendants of the Caribs, the Kuna live in much the same manner as their ancestors. The Kuna have a matriarchal society in which the line of inheritance passes through the women. The Kuna speak their own language called "Tule." While on the San Blas islands, many Kuna speak Spanish and even some English. They live in thatched roof huts made from materials found in the jungle.

A young man, after marriage, must live in his mother-in-law's house and work for several years under apprenticeship to his father-in-law. Divorce is uncommon, although it requires no more than the husband to gather his clothes and move out of the house. The Kuna have a custom for every event in their life; these customs are passed on to their children through dances and chants. These events are also documented in their Molas.
Robert Harding.

Passengers

125 passengers

A. Fowler
D. Kuntz
W. C. Dawson
G. Hobson
Mrs. Hobson
H. Leffingwell
H. W. Corbett
J. J. Lints
O. C. Lee
W. E. Klink
J. H. Ulmer
D. Busch
Chas Saroni
H. H. Tillinghast
Mrs. Tillinghast
J. Boston
Charles E. Lang, lady and child
J. H. Lewis
Mrs. Lewis
Mrs. Turnbull
F. P. Sweet, lady and child
Mrs. Nichols
J. A. Grey
John Wilson
Mr. Coryell
Mrs. Coryell
A. Roberts
Morris Ernesteen
D. Hersch
H. Newhouse
Wm. Flusher
Mr. Lale
Dr. Dafforn
J. Hendricks
Mr. Jacobs
Mr. Emanuel
Mr. Gustous
Mr. Josephs
Mr. Eleazer and servant
Mr. Gocho
Mr. May
Lewis Bru
Jose Morell
Edwin Sidle
D. Quintano
Theodore Roserea and three boys
Mr. Monteverde
Mr. Sola
Wm. C. Moreage
Mr. Mexico
Jose Orea
Mr. Corona
J. Carona
M. Carona
F. Masuern
M. Vel Nueva
J. Vel Nueva
J. Couforte
J. Hernandez
L. Valera
M. Elmarde
A. Gomez
R. C. Auas
Mr. Fernandez and servant
Mr. Corea
Mr. Frazer
D. Spatz and servant
F. Fernandez
Jasus Texas
R. Paxton
J. Fontana
M. Fontano (given that the Fontana and Fontano are in a row, this may be an error)
T. Fontana
Wm. Plata
Wm. Addison
John M. Breck
and 46 in the steerage.

February 25, 1851, Daily Alta California, San Francisco

THE COLUMBIA STEAMSHIP.--This new steamship of the Pacific Mail Company, which arrived her yesterday, is to be put on the route between this city and Oregon, transporting the U.S. mail. This will be a pleasant bit of information for our Oregon neighbors. They will now, like ourselves, be treated with a mail twice a month. The Columbia will leave for the Columbia River in a few days.

February 25, 1851, Daily Alta California, San Francisco

Lieut. Beal.--Again we have the pleasure of announcing the arrival in our city of Lieut Ed. F. Beal of the U.S. Navy. He came up from Panama as commander of the new steamship Columbia. Lieut. Beal is well known to the American public for his achievements in the way of travel. Some of his express journeys have proved him possessed of great physical endurance and determination of purpose.

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Sources: As noted on entries and through research centers including National Archives, San Bruno, California; CDNC: California Digital Newspaper Collection; San Francisco Main Library History Collection; and Maritime Museums and Collections in Australia, China, Denmark, England, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Wales, Norway, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, etc.

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