Passenger Lists: San Francisco 1800s


 

SS Cortes

Arrive San Francisco

October 9, 1852 
Captain Thomas B. Cropper
From New York via Panama 

Passage

October 9, 1852, Daily Alta California, San Francisco

ARRIVAL OF THE CORTES!

The magnificent new steamer Cortes, Capt. Thos. B. Cropper, built to run with the Winfield Scott, in the Independent Line between this port and Panama, arrived yesterday afternoon at about half-past 12 o'clock, 13-1/2 days from Panama. She brings 352 passengers, whose names are in the report in another column.

The Cortes is truly a splendid vessel, and she has performed a fine trip. She is 225 feet in length, 27-1/2 in depth, and her tonnage 1800 tons. We shall notice her more fully to-morrow.

She brings no later dates, except from Panama, which is of the 21st. We are abundantly supplied with files by her excellent purser Mr. Walter K. Smith, and by our attentive friends Berford & Co. through their messenger Mr. G. H. Hudson. Our thanks are also due to Capt. Cropper, who stopped his ship in the lower bay to take on board our reporter.

Memoranda

The first voyage of the steamship Cortes from Panama to San Francisco.

She sailed from Panama at 9 p.m., 21st Sept. Arrived at Acapulco September 27th. Sailed from Acapulco 5 p.m., Sept 28th. Experienced a severe gale on th 30th Sept and has had heavy seas and strong head winds all the way up from Acapulco.

The Winfield Scott arrived at Panama on the evening of the 19th September. The California arrived at Panama 17th Sept. Sailed from Panama on the evening of the 20th; sailed from Acapulco at 7 p.m., September 27th.

We have received some late and important new from the Lobos Islands by the Panama papers received by the steamer Cortes. The ship Manlius from New York, arrived off the Lobos Islands on the 10th of September, during a fog. The next morning she was discovered by General Deusta, Commander General of the Maine, and the captain was soon summoned on board.

There he was shown all the documents and decree of the Peruvian Government, prohibiting the sealing or loading of Guano from said islands, without permit from the government. He then declared that he supposed himself to have been acting in a perfectly legal manner, anil added that, by the perusal of the documents, he was fully convinced that he had been entirely misinformed. He then expressed his determination to leave the islands immediately, and requested tbe favor of a recommendation to the government agents in Lima fnr a charter, on account of the said government, which should enable him to load guano from the Lobos or any other deposits of the government, and proceed to any port in the United States designated by the government agents.

The recommendation was freely granted by the Gen., without compromising himself, for he was not authorised to grant said charter. The vessel then proceeded to Callao, and thus was any collision avoided.

From the above it may be safely inferred that no trouble is likely to arise from this much vexed question. It is a cause for congratulation on all sides.

October 12, 1852, Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, California

The New Steamer Cortes, -- The arrival of this fine steamer at San Francisco seems to have created quite a sensation. She is a new steamer, and is to run in connection with the Winfield Scott, between San Francisco and Panama.

The Herald thus describes her:

The new steamer Cortes, which arrived here yesterday from New York by way of Cape Horn, attracts a good deal of attention. She is a beautiful specimen of naval architecture, and has proved herself to be one of the fleetest vessels afloat.

While in the port of Valparaiso, she was visited and examined by the English Admiral and many of his officers, including officers of the Engineer corps, and they all concurred in opinion with the American officers present, that a more perfect model of naval architecture never floated on the ocean.

The Cortes is 300 horse power, consuming only 20 tons of coal per day. She has a wheel 31 feet 5 inches in diameter, making 15 revolutions per minute. Her extreme length is 227 feet, beam 32, and drawing only 9 feet 6 inches water, although she has on board upwards of 80 tons of spare machinery and stores for other vessels of the line. She has accommodations for 800 passengers. The average distance run by her from Valparaiso to Panama, was 250 miles each day.

The following is a list of the officers of the Cortes: Thomas B. Cropper, Commander; Walter G. Smith, Purser; Elihu B. Phelps, Chief Engineer; James Bryant, Chief Officer; G. O. Gunn, Surgeon.

Passengers

October 8, 1852, Daily Alta California, San Francisco
Passengers by the SS Cortes, October 8 1852.

October 10, 1852, Daily Alta California, San Francisco

CAPT CROPPER AND HIS PASSENGERS.

We refer our readers to a card, in another column, from the cabin passengers on the steamer Cortes to her commander Capt. Cropper. It is intended as a counter statement to one which appeared on Saturday from a few of her passengers, who, it appears, were a little disappointed in not having ice creams and pate' de foie gras for luncheons.

October 12, 1852, Sacramento Daily Union, Sacramento, California

The New Steamer Cortes.

The arrival of this fine steamer at Sin Francisco seems to have created quite a sensation. She is a new steamer, and is to run in connection with the VVinfield Scott, between San Francisco and Panama.

The Herald thus describes her:

The new steamer Cortes, which arrived here yesterday from New York, by the way of Cape Horn, attracts a good deal of attention. She is a beautiful specimen of naval architecture, and has proved herself to he one of the fleetest vessels afloat. We published a full description of her a short time since, which we extracted from a New York paper. While in the port of Valparaiso, she was visited and examined by the English Admiral and many of his officers, including officers of the Engineer corps, and they all concurred in opinion with the American officers present, that a more perfect model of naval architecture never floated on the ocean.

The Cortes is 300 horse power, consuming only 20 tons of coal per day. She has a wheel 31 feet 5 inches in diameter, making 15 revolutions per minute. Her extreme length is 227 feet, beam 32, and drawing only 9 feet 6 inches water, although she has on board upwards of 80 tons of machinery and stores for other vessels of the line. She has accommodations for 800 passengers. The average distance run by her from Valparaiso to Panama, was 250 miles each day.

The following is a list of the officers of the Cortes: Thomas B. Cropper, Commander; Walter G. Smith, Purser; Elihu B. Phelps, Chief Engineer; James Bryant, Chief Officer; G. O. Gunn, Surgeon.

Compliments from passengers by the Cortes, October 9, 1852.

Rounding the Horn.New York to Cape Horn to San Francisco.
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Fifty-five degrees 59 minutes South by 67 degrees 16 minutes West: Cape Horn—a buttressed pyramid of crumbly rock situated at the very bottom of South America—is a place of forlorn and foreboding beauty that has captured the dark imaginations of explorers and writers from Francis Drake to Joseph Conrad. For centuries, the small stretch of water between Cape Horn and the Antarctic Peninsula was the only gateway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It’s a place where the storms are bigger, the winds stronger, and the seas rougher than anywhere else on earth. In Rounding the Horn the author brings the reader along for a thrilling, exuberant tour. Weaving together stories of his own nautical adventures with long-lost tales of those who braved the Cape before him—from Spanish missionaries to Captain Cook—and interspersing them with breathtaking descriptions of the surrounding wilderness,

Around Cape Horn Sailing DVD. New York to Cape Horn to San Francisco.
Around Cape Horn: Capt. Irving Johnson Sailing DVDNew York to Cape Horn to San Francisco.
Few will ever experience such adverse conditions especially considering 1920's square rigger design, the technology and lack of meteorology available to assist the crews manage four masted ships with huge sail plans. Along with the challenging seas, this highly-regarded film was shot when cameras were bulky. Captain Irving is engaging. Actors were not used. This is real footage with real people.

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Sources: As noted on entries and through research centers including National Archives, San Bruno, California; CDNC: California Digital Newspaper Collection; San Francisco Main Library History Collection; and Maritime Museums and Collections in Australia, China, Denmark, England, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Wales, Norway, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, etc.

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