Passenger Lists: San Francisco 1800s


 

SS Tennessee

Arrive San Francisco

April 14, 1850
Captain Cole
From New York via Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Valparaiso, Chile; Panama

Passage

Monday Morning, April 15, 1850, Daily Alta California, San Francisco: 

ARRIVAL OF THE TENNESSEE!

One Week Later from the United States!

"The U.S. Pacific Mail Steamship, Tennessee, Captain Cole, arrived yesterday morning from Panama, coming to anchor about 12 o clock. Being Sunday, or citizens flocked to the various points of debarkation, and the harbor swarmed with small boats filled with living freight eager to board the new steamship, and obtain intelligence from friends far away. The Tennessee left Panama on the evening of the 23rd inst., and has consequently been twenty days making the trip, this however is attributed to the fact of her coal being of an inferior quality, as she has given evidence of being a very fast sailer. Her qualities as a sea boat, we heard highly spoken of by passengers on board.

Isthmus of Panama. 1800s.

She brought from Panama the largest number of passengers that ever arrived at this port in one vessel, enclosing within her staunch ribs 551 souls exclusive of the officers and crew.
The mail from New York had not reached Panama up to the date of the sailing of the steamer, but we have papers from New York to the 21st of February, and from New Orleans to the 6th of March, the latter containing still later dates from Washington and the other Northern cities. All matters of interest up to the latest period will be found in our summary. When the Tennessee left, there were about 800 passengers awaiting transportation at that port for San Francisco.

The Oregon, Captain Patterson, arrived at Panama on the 20th of March. During her trip down a steerage passengers had his trunk broken open and robbed of about 800 dollars in gold dust. The passengers raised by subscription the sum of 700 dollars and presented it to him.

A returning Californian was robbed in Panama on the 20th of March, at the New York Hotel, of 3,300 dollars.

The steamship Sarah Sands was at Callao, at latest dates, but hourly expected when the steamer sailed.

An emeute (sic) occurred at Panama on the evening of the 23rd, between some intoxicated sailors and the soldiers, of police, which resulted in the imprisonment of the ringleaders. The affair occasioned considerable excitement.

The steamship Panama was to sail positively on the 1st inst, so that she may be confidently looked for in one week from today.

Intelligence had reached Panama of a revolution having broken out at Guayaquil, on the 12th of March, between the soldiers and the lower order of people. No serious results were anticipated.

Passengers

California. Lisbeth Haas Aavoir, H. 
Abercrombie, T. H. 
Adams, C. 
Adams, J. 
Allen, E. 
Allen, H. 
Ames, A. 
Armstrong, J. 
Atkinson, S. 
Austin, J. 
Autler, O. H. 
Ayres, J. 
Bachelder, W. 
Barker, N. 
Barlow, P. 
Barry, S. 
Barton, S. W. 
Bateman, J. 
Baxter, H. 
Beauchamp, G. 
Beevan, L. 
Bekeart, N. 
Belkuah, Count and servant 
Bennett, 
Blaisdell, H. 
Blake, G. W. 
Blasden, J. 
Blattino, 
Bodair, R. 
Bodine, A. 
Bonham, S. 
Bontieore, F. 
Boring, C. 
Boring, Master 
Boring, Miss 
Boring, Mrs. 
Boring, S. 
Bowker, T. 
Bowles, M. 
Bracket, J. 
Briggs, G. H. 
Britton, A. 
Brown, J. K. 
Brown, M. L. and servant 
Bryant, J. 
Buck, S. 
Buckley, J. 
Bullock, W.C. 
Burger, J. B. 
Burnett, W. 
Burns, Captain 
Burns, R. 
Butler, H.S. 
Butterfield, Mrs. 
Cannon, P. 
Carmichael, P. 
Carpenter, A. 
Carpenter, H. 
Carrington, A. 
Carrington, S. 
Carton, C. 
Caswell, J. B. 
Chalebois, A. 
Chambers, James 
Chandler, G. 
Chapin, B. M. 
Chapman, N. 
Chatterton, J. 
Chemington, E. 
Chesebro, O. 
Chonteau, S. 
Clark, J.C. 
Clark, S. 
Clarkson, J. 
Claugh, N. 
Claxparton, J. 
Clay, J. 
Clinch, T. 
Cobb, T. 
Coburn, J. 
Cockburn, R. 
Cole, J. 
Collins, T. 
Comstock, 
Conner, E. 
Conrad, J. 
Cooley, M. 
Cooper, J. 
Cornell, B. F. 
Corson, D. 
Cove, E. 
Cowle, C. 
Coye, L. 
Cram, G. 
Crook, A. R. 
Crosby, 
Crosby, Israel 
Crosby, P. 
Cullum, J. M. 
Cummins, 
Dank, F. 
Darby, J. 
Darcey, J. 
Darcey, T. 
Davis, C. 
Davis, H. 
Davis, J. 
Davis, M. 
Davis, S. 
Davy, W. 
Dayton, B. 
Deernig, N. (Deering ) 
Delmonica, 
Demers, 
Devaugh, J. 
Dickey, B. 
Dinsmore, W. B. 
Dodd, J. K. 
Dodd, W. 
Doe, B. 
Dogherty, C. 
Drake, J. 
Drake, T. 
Drum, A. 
Drum, T. 
Duchesin, H. 
Duffy, M. 
Dugray, 
Dupuy, A. 
Dysart, 
Ecklass, G. 
Elam, R. 
Elder, T. 
Ellott, 
Ellsworth, H. 
Everett, H. 
Farrell, A. 
Farwell, J. D. 
Fay, John 
Feerris, G. 
Ferguson, E. 
Fitch, J. 
Flanders, C. 
Fois, G. 
Ford, J. 
Fortier, A. 
Foster, 
Foster, S. 
Fountain, C. 
Fowle, D. 
French, P. H. 
Froutinan, E. 
Fuiejan, T. 
Fulton, E. 
Gallagher, P. 
Galland, A. and servant 
Garret, J. 
Gavin, D. 
Gaynon, 
Geer, F. 
George, F. J. 
George, J. 
Gerenan, J. 
Gibson, 
Gifford, E. 
Gifford, E. and servant 
Goodwin, H. M. 
Gorden, H. 
Gordon, Mrs. 
Gould, E. 
Graff, J. 
Green, J. 
Green, J. 
Griner, H. 
Gummel, P. 
Hailey, A. 
Hall, J. 
Hall, J. 
Hall, J. 
Hall, J. 
Hall, J.C. 
Hammond, J. 
Harman, A 
Harness, J. 
Harper, W. H. 
Harriman, J. 
Harris, C. G. 
Harris, J. 
Hartman, Miss 
Harven, J. 
Haskell, 
Hassam, J. 
Hastings, Mrs. 
Haugh, A. 
Hayes, 
Haygood, G. 
Hazeltine, J. 
Hazelton, G. 
Healy, G. 
Higgins, J. 
Hill, J. 
Hobbettsell, H. 
Holbrook, William 
Holt, T. 
Hooker, J. 
Hooper, J. 
Hotchkiss, E. 
Houlft, T. 
Houseman, E. 
Howard, J. 
Hoyt, N. 
Hubbard, C 
Hughes, L. G. 
Hulls, W. R. 
Hunt, J. 
Hunt, J. 
Hutchinson, C. 
Hutchinson, Mrs. 
Hyde, B. M. 
Ingersoll, L. 
Jackson, H. 
Jacobs, J. 
Jeorney, F. 
Jonatan, (Jonathan ) 
Jones, A. 
Jones, E. 
Joseph, G. 
Justice, 
Keever, E. B. 
Kells, 
Kelong, Mrs. 
Keys, J. 
Killduff, P. D. 
Kipp, 
Kipp, J. 
Kirby, J. 
Kohler, G. F. 
Koley, H. 
Lafarge, P. 
Lafflan, E. 
Lafitte, H. 
Languedoc, J.M. 
Larrimore, Mrs. 
Lawer, H. 
Lentell, J. 
Liberger, V. 
Lighthall, 
Lilly, C. 
Lindsay, 
Lissack, A. 
Long, T. 
Low, I. 
Lucia, P. 
Lull, G. W. 
Lynch, B. 
Lynch, F. 
Lynch, G. 
Lynch, P. 
Mackly, T. 
Manahan, B. B. 
Markly, A. G. 
Marshall, J. 
Martin, J. 
McAfee, J. 
McConner, H. 
McCord, J. 
McIver, H. 
McLeod, J. 
McMahon, D. 
McMahon, J. 
McMahon, M. (Rasumussen questions: McMahan ) 
McNolby, M. 
McReduat, J. 
Mead, James 
Merchant, 
Meyers, J. 
Miller, A. 
Miller, H. P. 
Miner, J. 
Miner, M. 
Minor, J. 
Minturn, Mrs. 
Monford, B. 
Mooge, J. L. 
Moore, C. 
Moore, C. 
Moore, G. W. 
Moore, H. 
Moore, J. 
Morris, L. 
Moulton, D. 
Moulton, J. B. 
Muir, A. M. 
Murray, J. 
Myers, 
Neefus, F. 
Newhall, C. 
Newlin, J. 
Niven, L. G. 
Noe, J. 
Olendord, W. 
Oliper, 
Orrego, A. 
Overton, R. 
Owens, A. G. 
Paige, C. 
Palchin, R. 
Pallin, 
Palmer, Mrs. 
Pellesier, J. 
Pendleton, W. F. 
Perkins, J. 
Peters, H. 
Pfoor, Catharine 
Pfoor, H. 
Pierce, C. 
Pierce, J.P. 
Pitman, 
Plummer, J. 
Poor, H. 
Porter, A. 
Powers, C. G. 
Powers, J. R. 
Pratt, L. 
Price, D. 
Pringle, R. 
Proser, C. 
Pruett, J. 
Pruett, Mrs. 
Pue, 
Puffer, W. N. 
Quimby, G. 
Ramus, J. 
Randall, W. 
Raugher, J. 
Raymond, H. 
Raymond, Mrs. 
Reed, S. T. 
Reilly, C. O. 
Rhodes, William 
Richards, W. 
Richardson, M. 
Ridgeley, J. 
Ringo, A. R. 
Ritchie, Young 
Roberts, R. E. 
Robinson, A. 
Rochan, L. 
Roden, H. 
Ropes, E. 
Rose, M. 
Rosenburg, G. 
Rossering, E. 
Rossetor, E. 
Rowe, H. R. 
Rucker, O. H. 
Rusenburg, F. 
Safford, W. 
Salmerstein, F. 
Salter, 
Sanches, V. 
Sargent, S. 
Sarles, E. 
Sarles, E. R. 
Schenck, C. B. 
Schloss, F. 
Scranton, E. 
Seymour, J. 
Shepherd, Mrs. and 2 children (Rasmussen questions: Shephard) 
Shepherd, R. Shepherd (sic) 
Silva, I.S. 
Silva, J.J. 
Simmons, G. 
Simon, H. 
Simonson, 
Simonson, B. 
Simpson, L. 
Simpson, S. 
Sinclair, J. 
Sison, G. 
Skay, B. 
Smith, J. 
Smith, L. 
Smith, N. P. 
Soldier, 
Staples, A. 
Starke, S. 
Stebbins, 
Stephans, F. 
Stephen, H. 
Sterritt, J. 
Stewart, J. 
Stiles, C. 
Stocking, Dr. 
Strong, C. 
Studson, M. 
Sullivan, D. 
Suneman, S. 
Swain, R. N. 
Sweeney, F. 
Sweet, J. H. 
Sylvester, A. 
Tabor, J. B. 
Talafoiro, S. 
Tauman, Mrs. 
Taylor, W.H. 
Ticknor, 
Tier, R. 
Tileman, J. 
Tobias, A. and servant 
Tobin, J.W. 
Tobin, W. 
Townsend, O. 
Treat, Miss Helene 
Trueder, S. 
Tuley, S. P. 
Tunice, C. 
Turner, D. C. 
Turner, G. 
Vancourt, D. 
Voorhees, L. 
Vroonise, G. 
Wadsworth, H. 
Walsh, S. 
Warner, H. 
Washburn, A. 
Webster, 
Welden, H. 
Welles, E. 
Wemple, R. E. 
West, 
Wetherell, A. 
Wheeler, C. 
Wheeler, R. 
White, A. M. 
White, J. 
Whiting, F. H. 
Whiting, J. W. 
Whitmore, Dr. 
Wiler, D. 
Wiler, H. 
Williams, C. 
Williams, D. 
Williams, J. 
Williams, J.W. 
Wilson, E. 
Wilson, J. 
Wilson, P.O. 
Wilson, R. 
Winant, P. Walton 
Wlash, J. 
Woir, H. 
Wolff, E. 
Wolff, Mons. 
Wood, 
Wood, C. 
Woods, L. Allvord 
Woodson, F. 
Wooley, E.S. 
Worrawick, J. 
Wymore, Mrs. 
Yorth, A. 
Young, James 
Zabriskie, A.Z.

May 31, 1850, Placer Times

Journal of a Passenger who came up in the Tennessee
CHAPTER IV

Steamer Empire City, February 18, 1850

It has been decreed and decided, by old and young, little and big, that the "Empire City" can out-roll the Jews, supposing the Jews given to rolling. We shall soon be in a warm climate, and then, unless it gets much warmer, we shall have "hot rolls, not only for breakfast but all times of day. "Rock the cradle, Lucy" was onjoined upon Miss Long, but if Miss Long and her cradle were here, both would get rocked to their heart's content, without any efforts on their part. To walk the deck is indeed a "feet," and to keep on your feet, and your feet under you, is easier said than done, and can't be done easy. The first thing you know your heels are heaven-ward, humanity reversed, and the next thing (if you hit your head) "you don't know anything."

Of the four hundred and sixty-five passengers I think at least four hundred and fifty-five of them have been most blessedly and gloriously, sea-sick, and many are still in that delightful situation, their faces plainly expressing "'twere rain to tell thee all I feel." It would be as much as one's life is worth to strike up "A life on the ocean wave;" the music would not be appreciated, and the musician might find himself treated to a salt-water bath. Theo beauties of the sea are at a discount, and I doubt much if a genteel and lady-like mermaid should pop up and intimate her desire to "breakfast on board," she would receive the slightest attention, or meet an extended band to pull her ladyship over the ride. Now everybody knows, or ought to know, that a maid, he she a "mer" or a Yankee maid expects some time or other to have a hand offered her, which she decides whether to slight or not, bit to have a "sleight-of-hand" trick played on her, as in the case above supposable, would be unkind, ungallant, ungenerous, ungenteel, and unexpected, and consequently unsupportable and unbearable; and on the whole, I hope Mademoiselle Mer-maid will conclude to take her breakfast at "some oyster shop down below." A bowl of "clam soup" or "a dozen raw" will be much more wholesome than ship fare.

Once again the sun condescends to shine upon us. The sea is getting smoother and more respectable, a few of the sea-sick ones begin to crawl out on deck, in the warm sunshine, and evidently feel better. The table is filling up and some of the passengers too, judging by the manner in which the "chicken fixins" disappear. Appetites are looking up decidedly, and the larder will suffer some. In short, there is a decided improvement in "men and things", several clean shirt collars are visible, and some demonstrations towards a shave are discoverable. The "sky lights" are thrown open to admit the sun's ray's and dry the wet furniture in the saloon. My mattress is less like a wet sponge, and will, I hope, no longer throw a "damper"' o'er my spirits. The decks are becoming promenadable, and we are glad once more to be upright citizens, and have a chance to use our boots. We have some queer fish on board, some of whom have a happy knack of helping themselves to any bottle of private wine within reach, and the only safe way to manage the matter is to keep the bottle between the knees, to use by instalments. Nicely reared rome of them must have been, but I suppose it is in accordance with the "spirit of the ago."

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Sources: As noted on entries and through research centers including National Archives, San Bruno, California; CDNC: California Digital Newspaper Collection; San Francisco Main Library History Collection; Maritime Library, San Francisco, California.

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