Passenger Lists: San Francisco 1800s SS Unicorn
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Bridge to the Castle.

 

Isthmus of Panama.

SS Unicorn

Arrive San Francisco

February 5, 1850 
Captain George S. Porter 
From Panama

Passage

Wednesday Morning, February 6, 1850, Daily Alta California, San Francisco 

ARRIVAL OF THE UNICORN!

NO LATER FROM THE UNITED STATES!
Accident to Steamer Crescent City.

The U.S. Pacific Mail Steamship Unicorn, Capt. George S. Porter, arrived (28 days) from Panama yesterday, about 1 o'clock and came to anchor above Happy Valley. She left Panama on the 11th inst., with 160 passengers and a small amount of freight. One day before she arrived at Acapulco she saw the smoke of a steamer, which must have been that of the Oregon with our Congressional delegation on board. We are indebted to Capt. Porter for a copy of the Panama Echo of the 5th of January. It does not, however, contain much intelligence of import. She brings no later news from the States. We regret to learn that the apprehensions which were excited with reference to the steamship Crescent City proved correct. We extract the following, as the most reliable information, from the Panama Echo of the 5th inst., furnished by Mr. Leland, a relative of our late confrere of the Pacific News.

The schr. Sarah A. Smith, from Belfast, Maine, arrived at Chagres, on Sunday evening last, (30th of Dec.). She brought 32 passengers from the unfortunate steamship Crescent City, which vessel she encountered at sea on the 16th ult. We are indebted to Mr. W. W. Leland, brother to the editor of thePacific News for the narrative of the disaster on the Crescent City, and the events which transpired down to the arrival at Chagres.

February 7, 1850, Daily Alta California, San Francisco

The Unicorn--We publish, with pleasure, the following card from the passengers on the Unicorn on her recent trip from Panama:

The Hon. Judge Morse, of Massachusetts, was duly selected as chairman and A.J. Morrell, of New York, appointed secretary of the meeting.

The president in due forth called the meeting to order and made known the object of same.
Mr. Morrell proposed that a committee of five be appointed by the president to draft resolutions, meeting the approbation of the passengers.

Whereupon, John S. Robb, Esq., late editor of the St. Louis Reveille, Captain J.H. Eggleston, of Massachusetts, W.W. Leland, Esq., of New York, W. Kendall, of Connecticut, and E.P. Tucker of Massachusetts.

The committee withdrew, and after a short absence reported the annexed resolutions, all of which were adopted:

Resolved, That we, the passengers on board the substantial, although slow steamer Unicorn, deem it just and proper that we should express publicly without fear or favor our sentiments in regard to the noble, gentlemanly and praiseworthy conduct of Captain George S. Porter, George R. Baldwin, first officer, Theodore L. Schell, purser, Alexander W. McNaughton, surgeon, and Herman Sanderson, chief engineer.

Resolved, That we deem the worthy and meritorious commander and above mentioned officers, beyond reproach, and fully qualified to occupy the stations to which they severally belong.

Resolved, that J.M. Fogell and H.O. Mathews, first and second steewards and the minor officers are entitled to favor and regard.

Resolved, That our proceedings be made know to Captain Porter, and being duly signed by the president and secretary, be published in the San Francisco and other papers.

Be it further Resolved, That our unfeigned thanks be rendered to Almighty God, for the mercies and benefits received at his hands, and especially for his care, and watchful providence over us through the course of our present voyage, beseeching him to continue these blessings to us always.

Jona Morse, President
A.J. Morrell, Secretary.


Steamer Unicorn, February 5, 1850

Mechanical Printing Press, London News.
Mechanical Printing Press

Among the passengers we found our old friend "Solitaire" of the "Reveille," now one of the firm of Marcy, Robb, Robinson & Co., State printers.

He has a couple of presses aboard with type and material, and we shall soon expect to see the first number of the "Statesman" from San Jose. We are glad to welcome the return of our confrere and happy to see that he intends to make this his home, an inference which we draw from the fact that he is not solitaire and aloneo, as we had the pleasure of meeting Mrs. Robb and welcoming her to our shores.

With reference to the Postal arrangement we find the following: The Post Office business appears to be better arranged now than it was a short time ago. We have now traveling agents in every direction. Last week we had four of them in Panama at the same time; one of them, Mr. Faulkner, editor of the "Pacific Now," came from San Francisco in the Unicorn, on his way to New York, with the California mail. Another, Mr. Kaukle, went up the Pacific on board the Panama, escorting the 60 letter bags for the Eldorodo. Then Capt McLean went back home with a heavy load of mail matter, and the active and enterprising Mr. Seymour arrived by the Falcon. This gentleman will remain here a full month, waiting for the next mails. So that we may hope for the future things will be regulated a little better, and that the mails will henceforward arrive and depart in due time.

The Echo publishes a card of the passengers from this port to Panama in the Unicorn, complimentary in the highest degraee to Captain Porter, which we feel is deserved from the statements made to us by persons who have arrived in her from Panama.

We notice the death of Mr. Dennis Hideout in Panama on the 1st ult. He was a native of Salem, Mass., and recently from this place on the steamcr Unicorn. He had resided in California and had accumulated about $8,000. His friends attended his couch faithfully.

Cargo

February 10, 1850, Daily Alta California, San Francisco

FINE WATCHES & JEWELRY --

The subscriber has just received, per steamer Unicorn, and other recent arrivals, a large and splendid assortment of FINE WATCHES AND JEWELRY, of every description, to which the attention of his friends and the public is invited. He flatters himself that he is now prepared to please all who may favor him with a call. Jewelry, of every description, manufactured to order, from CALIFORNIA GOLD.

Wm. A. Woodruff, Clay street,
opposite the Custom House.
N. B. Chronometers and Watches carefullly repaired and warranted.

Passengers

List not located.

February 7, 1850, Daily Alta California, San Francisco

The Unicorn.

We publish, with pleasure, the following card from the passengers on the Unicorn on her recent trip from Panama. The Hon. Judge Morse, of Massachusetts, was duly solicited as chairman and A. J. Morrell, of New York, appointed secretary of the meeting.

The president in due form called the meeting to order and made known the object of same.

Mr. Morrell proposed that a oommittce of five be appointed by the president to draft resolutions, meting the opprobation of the passengers.

Whereupon, John S. Hobb, Esq., late editor of the St. Louis Reveille, Captain J. H. Egleston, of Massachusetts, W.W. Leland, Esq., of New York, W. Kendall of Connecticut, and E. P. Tucker of Massachusetts.

The committee withdrew, and after a short absence reported the annexed resolutions, all of which were adopted:

Resolved, That we, the passengers on board the substantial, although slow steamer Unicorn, deem it just and proper that we should express publicly without fear or favor our sentiments in regard to the noble, gentlemanly and praiseworthy conduct of Captain George S. Porter, George H. Baldwin, first officer, Theodore L. Schell, purser, Alexander W. McNaughton, surgeon, and Herman Sanderson, chief chineer.

Resolved, That ww deem the worthy and meritorious commander and above mentioned officers, beyond reproach, and fully qualified to occupy the stations to which they severally belong.

Resolved, That J. M. Fogell and H. O. Mathews, first and second stewards and the minor officers are entitled to favor and regard.

Resolved, That our proceedings be made known to Captain Porter, and being duly signed by the president and secretary, be published in the San Francisco and other papers.

Be it further Resolved, that our unfeigned thanks be rendered to Almighty God, for the mercies and benefits received at his hands, and especially for his care and watchful providence over us through the course of our present voyage, beseeching him to continue thse blessings to us always.

JONA. MORSE, President
A. J. MORRELL, Secretary
Steamer Unicorn, Feb. 5, 1850

Vessels advertising as sailing from San Francisco 1850.

February 10, 1850, Daily Alta California, San Francisco

The Unicorn.

Well-grounded apprehensions are now entertained that this steamer will delay her departure from this port beyond the time appointed. It is understood that thoughts are entertained of sending her to Columbia river. We are not assured of the cause of this action, but opine it to have arisen from want of a complement of passengers to justify a Panama trip.


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Coming to America: A History of Immigration and Ethnicity in American LifeHistory of Immigration in America.
Roger Daniels
To California.This revised edition studies various waves of immigrants to the United States from the colonial era to the present. This is a useful book for anyone who has an interest in learning brief histories of most groups of immigrants to the United States. It also provides a theoretical understanding of the reasons for immigration.

Migration in World History (Themes in World History)Migration in World History.
Patrick Manning
Drawing on examples from a wide range of geographical regions and thematic areas, noted world historian Patrick Manning guides the reader through:

Migration.Migration in World History.
  • Trade patterns, including the early Silk Road and maritime trade
  • Effect of migration on empire and industry between 1700 and 1900
  • The earliest human migrations
  • Major language groups (illustrated with original maps)
  • Examination of civilizations, farmers and pastoralists from 3000 BCE to 500 CE
  • Various leading theories and debates surrounding the subject of migration.

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